Trade Agreements Of Turkey

Turkey is a member of the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership (Euromed) and should therefore conclude free trade agreements with all other Mediterranean partners in order to create a Euro-Mediterranean free trade area. In Chapter 6, the parties recognize that anti-competitive trade practices have the potential to undermine the effects of liberalization. They stress the importance of cooperation and consultation on the application of competition law. In addition, the chapter provides the contracting parties with the opportunity to take appropriate action where anti-competitive practice continues to affect trade despite previous cooperation and consultation. Priority is given to measures that least affect the operation of this agreement. Chapter 3 closely follows the approach of the WTO`s General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). It covers trade in all service sectors under the four types of supply. Separate annexes on the recognition of service provider qualifications (Annex X), the free movement of individuals providing services (Annex XI), e-commerce (Annex XIII), telecommunications services (Annex XVI), co-productions (Annex XV), financial services (Annex XVI), health services (Annex XVII), tourism and travel services (Annex XVII) and international road and logistics transport services (Annex XIX) complete the chapter with additional disciplines specific to these sectors. The lists of contracting parties with specific obligations and derogations from the treatment of the most favoured nation (MPF) are listed in AppendixES XII and IX respectively.

These lists are subject to regular revision to further liberalize the exchange of services between the two parties. The EU has decided to focus on bilateral trade agreements as an instrument for boosting growth, with the introduction of its new “Global Europe” trade strategy in 2006. In line with this strategy, the EU has begun negotiating free trade agreements with specific provisions on services, investment, public procurement and intellectual property rights, in order to increase/maintain its competitiveness in global markets. Turkey is preparing for such an environment. After starting and starting negotiations in parallel with the EU, Turkey is also adapting to all the issues covered in the agreements and negotiating next-generation free trade agreements with its potential partners. The Turkey-EU customs union has eliminated tariffs, quantitative restrictions and measures of equivalent effect in trade in industrial products to ensure the free movement of goods. As a result of the customs union, Turkey has opened its internal market to competition in the EU and third countries, while guaranteeing its exporters free access to the EU market.